Maps

All the maps used on the podcast so far…

Anatolia and Armenia 1025 AD

Anatolia and Armenia 1025 AD

Both maps above from Byzantine Military Organization on the Danube by Alexandru Madgearu

My map of the Balkans duing 11th century

My map of the Balkans duing 11th century

The Balkans 976 AD

The Balkans 976 AD

Anatolia 976AD

Anatolia 920AD with new Themes

Anatolia 920AD with new Themes

The new walls of Nikephoros Phokas from The Making of Byzantium by Mark Whittow

The new walls of Nikephoros Phokas from The Making of Byzantium by Mark Whittow

Bagratuni Armenia circa 1000

Bagratuni Armenia circa 1000

The Themes c950AD

The Themes c950AD

Bulgarian Empire c900 AD (from Runciman - First Bulgarian Empire)

Bulgarian Empire c900 AD (from Runciman – First Bulgarian Empire)

The Major Varangian trade routes. The Volga route is in red. The Dneiper (and one other) in purple. Existing trade routes in orange

The Major Varangian trade routes. The Volga route is in red. The Dneiper (and one other) in purple. Existing trade routes in orange

The Empire 900 AD

The Empire 900 AD

Europe and the Near East 900AD (worldhistorymaps.info)

Europe and the Near East 900AD (worldhistorymaps.info)

 

Anatolia 842AD with new Themes

Anatolia 842AD with new Themes

Arab-Byzantine border in Anatolia (author: CPlakidas at Wikipedia)

Arab-Byzantine border in Anatolia (author: CPlakidas at Wikipedia)

Anatolia 820AD with new Themes

Anatolia 820AD with new Themes

Anatolia 780AD with new Theme arrangements

Anatolia 780AD onwards with new Theme arrangements

The Realm of the Franks 481 to 814 (wikipedia)

The Realm of the Franks 481 to 814 (wikipedia)

Europe and the Middle East 800AD (worldhistorymaps.info)

Europe and the Middle East 800AD (worldhistorymaps.info)

Anatolia 700-800 AD

Anatolia 700-800 AD from a base map by CPlakidas from Wikipedia

Topographical map of the Balkans (from wikipedia)

Topographical map of the Balkans (from wikipedia)

Europe and the Near East in 700 (from worldhistorymaps.info)

Europe and the Near East in 700 (from worldhistorymaps.info)

Arabia and the Fertile Crescent in 600 AD

Arabia and the Fertile Crescent in 600 AD

The terrain of Europe and the Middle East from Colin McEvedy's Atlas of Medieval Europe

The terrain of Europe and the Middle East from Colin McEvedy’s Atlas of Medieval Europe

The Themes in 668 AD from A History of the Byzantine State and Society by Warren Treadgold

The Themes in 668 AD from A History of the Byzantine State and Society by Warren Treadgold

The Eastern provinces (commons.wikimedia.orgwikiUserCplakidas)

The Eastern provinces (commons.wikimedia.orgwikiUserCplakidas)

Byzantine-Persian border

Byzantine-Persian border

The campaigns of 624-28 by Mohammad Adil

The campaigns of 624-28 by Mohammad Adil

The environs of Constantinople

The environs of Constantinople

The Byzantine Empire in 620 AD. That should give you an idea of the size of the task ahead of Heraclius

The Byzantine Empire in 620 AD. That should give you an idea of the size of the task ahead of Heraclius

Linguistic map of the Byzantine Empire c565

Linguistic map of the Byzantine Empire c565

The Eastern Hemisphere in 600AD

The Eastern Hemisphere in 600AD

Byzantine Empire at its greatest extent, 565

Byzantine Empire at its greatest extent, 565

The First Gothic War

The First Gothic War

Siege of Rome map from Ancient Warfare Magazine Volume IV, Issue 3 (www.ancient-warfare.com)

Siege of Rome map from Ancient Warfare Magazine Volume IV, Issue 3 (www.ancient-warfare.com)

The Vandal War Campaign Map

The Vandal War Campaign Map

The Lazican Border

The Lazican Border

The Roman-Persian frontier in late antiquity

The Roman-Persian frontier in late antiquity

The Roman Empire c400AD

The Roman Empire c400AD

Constantinople in the Byzantine era

Constantinople in the Byzantine era

The Byzantine Balkan Provinces in the 6th century

The Byzantine Balkan Provinces in the 6th century

The Eastern Hemisphere in AD500

The Eastern Hemisphere in AD500

16 Comments

16 thoughts on “Maps

  1. Romulemus

    I’m not sure how helpful this will be or how accurate this map is but this YouTube video goes through the changing landscape of the entire world over the course of 50 centuries. https://youtu.be/dp0tqdu7fH4?t=4m51s

    I started the video off at 462AD but you can go as far back as 3000BC to 2014AD.

    Like I said, make sure to check for yourself of its accuracy and I hope that you do. Thanks for the podcast and continuing Mike Duncan’s work!

  2. Hello,

    Thank you for this historical maps.

    Can you help me? Who is the author of these maps? Or which is extracted from the book?

    • The maps are all online. The authors are credited on the individual episode pages https://thehistoryofbyzantium.com/. If you google the title of the map you will probably find them. Most come from wikipedia where their authors are also credited. Only the maps of Anatolia at the top are edited by me based on CPlakidas’ work.

      • Thank you for answer. I want to use the maps on my thesis. That’s why I need authors or books.

        now, what I write about you in my thesis, footnote or bibliography? what you want?

  3. Well if you are using the maps of Anatolia at the top you can say maps courtesy of Robin Pierson (thehistoryofbyzantium.com). But if you are using some of the others then just credit wikipedia or the individual authors.

  4. Pingback: Useful Maps for your Unit Three Study Activity! | Ms. Galloway's Honors World History

  5. Pingback: Useful Maps for your Unit Three Study Activity! | Ms. Galloway's Honors World History

  6. Dylan Rodrigues

    Hi! I just recently listened to the episode about the battle of Dara and I was looking for the map of the disposition of the two armies. However, I cannot find the map anywhere here… would be glad if you’d send me a link or something.

  7. Gregory Dow

    very interesting site

  8. DR

    Hi, great job! Is there any book you would recommend that focuses on telling the history of Byzantium mostly through maps? I’ve already checked your bibliography and I haven’t found something so specific, unless you suggest more general books, like the Cambridge History of the Byzantine Empire. Thanks!

    • The Palgrave Atlas of Byzantine History is full of maps about Byzantium. But it takes a dry, academic tone. It doesn’t tell the political history through maps either but covers wider issues like climate, use of the land, church history etc. It’s interesting but the maps are in black and white etc. Some drawbacks. The Penguin Atlas of medieval history that I recommend highly in the bibliography is really good for seeing political history develop but isn’t specific to Byzantium. The Cambridge History has few maps but is very good for those wanting to learn more academically.

  9. Would you be willing to add a uniform naming convention to these maps so that those of us going through the early podcasts can follow along more easily? Since you frequently say things like “you can see this in the map from episode 11,” maybe you could add something like “Episode 11 Map” to the beginning of the description, so we know which episode it was created for.

    For BONUS points, you could add all the episode numbers in brackets that each map is included in at the end of the description, e.g. “The Lazican Border [Ep. 8, 13, 14, 17, 18]..” That would be a LARGE list for your Constantinople map, haha! But right now it is very difficult to follow along with the maps, and I’ve had to abandon the map page and backtrack through the old blog posts just to make sure I’m able to follow along easily, or head over to Google to search for maps elsewhere. E.g. you may think it’s silly, because it’s listed right there on the second map, but the hunt for Sirmium caused me endless worry, and haunted my sleep.

    • … in fact I had to quit the podcast altogether, and ask my buddy Tiberius to take over for me, as I now spend most of my time biting my servants.

      • Apologies for the map confusion. I’m afraid I have no time at all at the moment to contemplate an update on that scale. There is a search box at the top of the page (right hand side) in which you can just enter “11” and you’ll quickly get to the episode number you want or use the index (a couple below that). But again, sorry for the inconvenience.

      • No apologies needed! You’ve already done me the biggest favor ever by taking the part of Roman history that I thought would be one slow, long, sad, overly pious slog and making it exciting and crystal clear instead–and where you CAN’T make it clear, you’ve dug into the historical sources and the controversies surrounding those and made THOSE clear. I couldn’t be happier with the podcast. And the website’s pretty darn good, too!

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